3 motorcyclists killed in separate Labor Day weekend accidents in Washington State

Three people were killed in three separate motorcycle accidents in the Washington state over the Labor Day weekend.

Only a week ago, the Washington State Patrol warned motorcyclists to ride more carefully as fatal accidents involving motorcycles have been on the rise in our state.

One of the motorcycle accidents occurred in Seattle and the other near Spokane:

  • On Monday night, a motorcyclist was killed when he crashed his motorcycle on a ramp on Interstate 5 at Mercer Street in Seattle. His passenger, a 24-year-old-woman, was taken to Harborview Medical Center with undisclosed injuries.
  • On Monday, a 24-year-old Mead Man, Shawn S. Towry, was killed when he rear-ended a vehicle slowing to make a left-hand-turn on westbound Highway 292 near Loon Lake.
  • On Saturday, Charles J. Roger, 24, of Vancouver, was killed when he lost control of his motorcycle while changing lines on Highway 14.

In two of these accidents, speed may have been a factor. In the third, driver inattention may have played a part. The WSP cite the most common causes of fatal motorcycle accidents as lane changing errors, speed, driving while impaired and driver inattention.

Motor vehicle accident fatalities have been coming down in the past few years but, unfortunately, fatal motorcycle accidents increased slightly in 2010 after years of decline. In the U.S., 4,309 motorcyclists were killed in accidents in 2010. Because motorcycles are less stable then cars and also can not be seen as well, deaths due to motorcycle accidents are approximately 30 times the number of car accident deaths.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in motorcycle accidents and the family of those killed.

Contact The Farber Law Group at 1-800-244-9087 or attorney@hgfarber.com to schedule a free and confidential case evaluation. Our Bellevue office is here to assist you.