Articles Posted in Cell Phone

Speeding is a huge factor in traffic accidents and speeding was the leading contributing cause for car accidents in Washington State. In 2009, there were 8,744 traffic accidents in King County alone where speeding was a contributing factor.

Speeding can be deadly because it increases a driver’s stopping distance, reduces maneuverability around curves and increases the distance a driver travels when reacting to situations such as cars stopping ahead of them. Speeding is also associated with other risky behaviors such as drinking and driving, aggressive driving and distracted driving.

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission has been working on changing driver behavior in an effort to reduce traffic accidents. To that end, they helped fund King County Target Zero Task Force which provided extra law enforcement patrols that specifically targeted speeding drivers.

The Seattle PI.com
reports that between July 15 and August 7, the emphasis patrols wrote 1,245 speeding tickets and also made three DUI arrests, three felony arrests, four aggressive driving violations, 15 cell phone citations, six seat belt tickets, 50 uninsured motorist tickets and 15 suspended/revoked license violations.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in motor vehicle accidents and the family of those who have been killed.

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AAA reports that the most dangerous days for teenage drivers fall between Memorial Day and Labor Day. AAA says that 7,300 teenage drivers and their passengers, ages 13-19, were killed in traffic accidents between Memorial Day and Labor Day in the years 2005-2009.

The AAA gives the following advice to parents of teenage drivers:

  • Limit your teen’s driving to “essential” trips during their first year of driving.
  • Continue practicing driving with your teen and coaching them even after they get their license.
  • Limit the number of passengers your teen can drive. Parents should also restrict their teen from riding as a passenger with a teenage driver.
  • Restrict night driving.
  • Be clear about driving rules by using a driving agreement.

Washington state has a graduated or intermediate driver’s license which has proven to prevent teenage car accident deaths. The intermediate driver’s sets for the following restriction on the license:

  • Passengers – Prohibits driving with passengers under the age of 20, unless they are immediate family, for the first six months. For the following six months, teens are not allowed to drive with more than 3 passengers under the age of 20 that are not family members.
  • Night Time Driving: Teens are prohibited from driving between 1am-5am unless with an adult 25 years of age or older.
  • Cell Phones: Talking of texting on a cell phone is strictly prohibited even with a hands-free device.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in motor vehicle accidents and the family of those who have died.

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The Wenatchee World reports that Gunnar Karl Doggett, 16, of Twisp, is charged with Vehicular Homicide in the Winthrop-area car accident that killed Seattle music director George Shangrow.

Shangrow was killed on July 31 as he drove to the Methow Valley Music Festival where he was to lecture. Shangrow was headed east when Doggett crossed the centerline and hit his vehicle head-on. Shangrow apparently had tried to avoid the accident by breaking and moving right. Doggett, however, did not appear to brake.

Police believe that Doggett was distracted at the time of the accident because he was on his cell phone. Police found Doggett’s cell phone open and believe it was in use when the car accident occurred.

Vehicular Homicide, RCW 46.61.520, can be charged if a person is killed in a motor vehicle accident and the driver was driving without regard for the safety of others.

Washington state vehicle code RCW 46.61.667 prohibits using a cellphone while driving. The law was enacted in June 2010. Teenagers are strictly prohibited from using cellphones while driving even if they are hands-free.

Distracted driving is a serious problem on our roadways. Distracted driving can include using a cell phone, reading a map, changing a radio station, eating or any other activity where one takes their eyes and focus off of the road even for a split second.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in motor vehicle accidents and the family of those killed with their wrongful death lawsuits.

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The Wenatchee World reports that Gunnar Karl Doggett, 16, of Twisp, is charged with Vehicular Homicide in theWinthrop-area car accident that killed Seattle music director George Shangrow.

Shangrow was killed on July 31 as he drove to the Methow Valley Music Festival where he was to lecture. Shangrow was headed east when Doggett crossed the centerline and hit his vehicle head-on. Shangrow apparently had tried to avoid the accident by breaking and moving right. Doggett, however, did not appear to brake.

Police believe that Doggett was distracted at the time of the accident because he was on his cell phone. Police found Doggett’s cell phone open and believe it was in use when the car accident occurred.

A17-year-old Snohomish girl may have been responsible for a head-on Highway 9 car accident near Cathcart on Thursday night due to the negligent use of her cell phone.

The Herald Net of Everett reports the teenager was driving on Highway 9 — the Snohomish-Woodinville Highway — when she crossed the highway centerline near 168th Street SE and hit a Mercedes driven by a 55-year-old Snohomish woman, head-on.

Both drivers were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

Washington State vehicle code RCW 46.61.667 “Using a Wireless Communications Device While Driving” prohibits motorists from using a hand-held cell phone while driving. RCW 46.61.668 “Sending, Reading, or Writing a Text Message While Driving” prohibits a motorist from sending, reading or writing a text message while driving. Both offenses are considered primary offenses.

Teenage drivers are strictly prohibited from using a cell phone while driving.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in car accidents caused by the negligence of another. With our help, you may recover compensation for your damages including medical costs and for pain and suffering.

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A small girl was killed in a horrible Bellingham pedestrian accident around 2:40pm on Thursday as she was walked in a crosswalk with her mother and her two siblings, ages 5 and 8.

The Seattle PI.com reports that the mother of the toddler was walking her children home from school when a car stopped to let the pedestrians cross. According to the report, a second vehicle driven by a teenage girl rear ended the stopped car, pushing it forward, killing the toddler and injuring her mother.

bellingham pedestrian accident attorneyThe small child was killed at the pedestrian accident scene. Her mother was taken to St. Joseph Hospital for treatment of undisclosed injuries.

The teenage girl driving the second vehicle was arrested for investigation of Vehicular Homicide. She was distracted in the rear-end accident and police are trying to determine whether she was using a cell phone at the time. To hit the first car with such force, the teenager driver may have been speeding as well.

Washington State vehicle code RCW 46.61.520 — Vehicular Homicide — provides that a driver can be charged with Vehicular Homicide if a person dies as a result of the negligent operation of a motor vehicle. This includes driving recklessly, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs or driving without regard for the safety of others.

At least one study found that using a cell phone while driving is equivalent to driving while intoxicated. The study, “Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society” found that drivers who were using cell phones braked more slowly and were more likely to be involved in a motor vehicle accident.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in motor vehicles accidents and pedestrian accidents. We also represent families with their wrongful death lawsuits when the death of a loved one was caused by the negligent of another.

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At the same time that a Distracted Driving Summit is being held in Washington, the actions of a school bus driver who was caught on camera text messaging while driving a busload of students came to light.

Students in the Broward School District in Florida took photos of their bus driver and sent them to the local TV station.
seattle bus accident attorney
One parent said she had called the school district to report the texting driver but said the district did not call her back. One of the children said, “I’m shocked. It’s so irresponsible and negligent.”

A member of the School Board said that a driver caught using a cell phone is suspended for five days and is terminated on the second offense. The report said, however, that the driver cannot be suspended without the approval of the school board.

It seems like the school board should have a rule that any driver caught texting or using a cell phone while driving is immediately dismissed.

Washington State has two laws which regulate using a wireless communication device while driving:

RCW 46.61.667 USING A WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS DEVICE WHILE DRIVING

RCW 46.61.668 SENDING, READING, OR WRITING A TEXT MESSAGE WHILE DRIVING

If a commercial driver is involved in a motor vehicle accident due to distracted driving, the driver may be found criminally negligent. Any injured parties could file a civil suit seeking damages from both the driver and the company that he or she works for if it is known that the company ignored previous complaints.

This information is provided by Seattle Car Accident Lawyer blog, a service of The Farber Law Group. We represent people who have been seriously injured in Seattle motor vehicle accidents and the family of those killed. With our help, you may recover compensation for your damages.

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A 59-year-old Snohomish woman was taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle with head and leg injuries after she was injured in a car accident n Monroe.

According to the Herald Net.com of Everett, the woman was traveling eastbound on Country Crescent Boulevard SE when she went down a 1-5foot embankment and hit a tree.

The woman told police that her brakes had failed.

The Washington State Patrol, in a media release, reports that troopers have issued 670 citations to motorists for using hand-held cell phones or for texting between the dates of June 10 and July 1. In addition, the report says that they have issued more than 500 warnings to violators.

State Patrol Chief John Batiste says because there is more compliance with the law, the violators are easier to spot.

Violation of the law, RCW 46.61.668, results in a $124 fine.

Did you think that only teenagers were irresponsible enough to text message on their cell phones while driving? Think not! According to a Pew Research study, adult drivers are text messaging while driving too.

Compare the following statistics for teenage drivers and adult drivers:

Teens and Cell Phones